Meet our Facilitators

 

Jennifer Tieman

Jennifer Tieman

I am a Researcher and Academic in Palliative and Supportive Services at Flinders University, and I have a particular interest in the intersection of technology, health, and palliative care. I am Director of a national online palliative care knowledge network, CareSearch, and am involved in a number of national projects that facilitate the use of digital technology to share information about palliative care, including End-of-Life Directions for Aged Care (ELDAC).

Deb Parker

Deb Parker

I am a Registered Nurse with clinical experience in Palliative and Aged care. I have been working in research in the area of palliative care for the last 20 years. I have a strong interest in the social aspects of death and dying. I am currently the Professor of Aged Care (Dementia) in the Faculty of Health at University of Technology Sydney, and Vice President of Palliative Care NSW.

Deb Rawlings

Deb Rawlings

I have over 30 years experience in Palliative and End of Life Care. My background is in nursing having trained, and worked clinically, in both oncology and palliative care. I have worked in palliative care in hospice, community and hospital. I have worked for many years on Commonwealth Palliative Care projects and am currently co-lead of the End Of Life Essentials project. I am an academic and researcher in Palliative and Supportive Services at Flinders University.

Lauren Miller-Lewis

Lauren Miller-Lewis

I am a Lecturer in the postgraduate positive psychology program within the School of Health, Medical, and Applied Sciences at CQUniversity Australia, and a researcher with the Research Centre for Palliative Care, Death and Dying at Flinders University. Prior to this I was part of CareSearch’s academic team, helping manage the Dying2Learn MOOC since its 2016 inception. My background is in health and developmental psychology, and I’m interested in applying strengths-based wellbeing perspectives to understand adversity, adaption, and resilience across the life-span, particularly as we approach the end-of-life. I’m especially passionate about understanding the influence meaning-in-life has on the way individuals, families and communities adapt to mortality, death, dying, and bereavement.

Christine Sanderson

Christine Sanderson

I am a Palliative Care Specialist working in New South Wales. Over the years, I have looked after many dying patients and their families, and I have learned a lot from them. My work takes me into people's homes, into hospital wards and emergency departments, and into nursing homes and hospices - wherever people are dying. I hope that through this MOOC I can share some of what I have learned with interested members of the community. I really believe thinking ahead about this can help us all to make choices for ourselves when our own time comes round. As it will for us all, sooner or later!

 

Learning modules

Each year, the Dying2Learn course has been delivered online over a five week period. Dying2Learn is run online via OpenLearning, a social online learning platform that delivers over 1500 MOOCs worldwide. Dying2Learn provides an opportunity to supportively learn about and contribute to discussions on issues around death and dying. The course leaders help guide students in their learning, but students are viewed as co-contributors rather than just recipients of education.

Learning Modules covered in Dying2Learn:

  1. How does today's society engage with death and dying? How do we use language to describe it?
  2. What does death 'look' like? How is death and dying portrayed in the media?
  3. If death is the problem, is medicine the answer? A look at what we die of, the role of medicine, and prolonging life versus prolonging death.
  4. Digital dying: Death during the internet-age.

Page last updated 30th September 2020