CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Insight into being a carer

A guest blog post by Raechel Damarell, Research Librarian, School of Health Sciences, Flinders University

  • 17 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3699
  • 1 Comments
Insight into being a carer
In May 2011, my widowed mother, Donne, was unexpectedly diagnosed with late stage oesophageal cancer. Mum was the epicentre of my family’s world and my best friend. She had selflessly cared for my two small children from infancy when I returned to work and rarely a day went by when we did not see or speak with her. When palliative chemoradiation proved brutal and her strength failed, it was without hesitation that my family invited her to move in with us so that we might care for her. We had no inkling of how the future would unfold, or what it might be like to watch a loved one gradually die, perhaps in great pain.  We simply felt it right and natural that family surround Mum right until the end. This end came 6 months later.
 

National Carers Week 2016 – Carers Count!

A guest blog post by Ara Cresswell, Chief Executive Officer, Carers Australia

  • 16 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4043
  • 0 Comments
National Carers Week 2016 – Carers Count!
National Carers Week gives all Australians the opportunity to show their support for Australia’s 2.8 million unpaid carers! This important awareness-raising week runs from 16 – 22 October, when all Australians can ‘let carers know they count’ and help build a carer-friendly Australia.

Australia’s unpaid carers make a tremendous contribution to the nation, undertaking challenging caring roles for family and friends that saves our country billions of dollars annually. This important role can limit carers’ own education and employment opportunities, which in turn can result in social isolation and financial stress, so it is important we acknowledge and recognise the vital work they do.

 

Highlighting Pain: World Hospice Day 2016

A guest blog post from Dr Jennifer Tieman, CareSearch Director, Associate Professor, Discipline Palliative and Supportive Services

  • 8 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 2632
  • 0 Comments
Highlighting Pain: World Hospice Day 2016
World Hospice and Palliative Care Day is a unified day of action to celebrate and support hospice and palliative care around the world. It is organised by a committee of the Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance. The purpose of this day is:
  • To share WHPCA's vision of increasing the availability of hospice and palliative care throughout the world by creating opportunities to speak out about the issues
  • To raise awareness and understanding of the needs – medical, social, practical, spiritual – of people living with a life limiting illness and their families
  • To raise funds to support and develop hospice and palliative care services around the world.

National Standards Assessment Program (NSAP)

A guest blog post by Lauren Ognenovski, NSAP Project Officer and Policy and Community Engagement Officer, Palliative Care Australia

  • 5 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3880
  • 0 Comments
National Standards Assessment Program (NSAP)
The National Standards Assessment Program (NSAP) is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and administered by Palliative Care Australia (PCA). NSAP has been running since 2008 and is a quality improvement program available for all specialist palliative care services in Australia.

NSAP aims to improve outcomes in palliative care and end-of-life care at a systematic level by providing a structured program for services. The structured 2-year NSAP cycle enables specialist palliative care services to enhance the quality of their governance and service delivery by:
  • Reviewing how they meet the National Palliative Care Standards (the standards)
  • Prioritising key improvement areas so they can better meet the standards
  • Developing and implementing a quality improvement action plan

“Something vital was missing throughout that process for Maria and her family.”

A guest blog post by Dr Joel Rhee BSc(Med) MBBS(Hons) GradCert(ULT) PhD, FRACGP

  • 27 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4249
  • 1 Comments
“Something vital was missing throughout that process for Maria and her family.”
I remember a patient some years ago. I’ll call her Maria. She was a lovely Italian woman, in her late 80’s, with a very supportive family.
 
Maria had developed very complex medical problems. She had heart issues, kidney problems and quite severe diabetes. In the last year of her life she had recurring kidney failure and breathing difficulties. She was going in and out of hospital every three or four weeks.
 
The medical team did their very best for her – they were very focused on her medical issues and her symptoms, and she received excellent medical care. A lot of focus was given to how best to look after her kidneys, her heart, her pain and her difficulty with breathing. As her problems multiplied and her needs became increasingly complex, the care she received continued to be excellent.

 
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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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