CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

The Role of Music Therapy in Addressing Anxiety in Palliative Care – Part Two

A guest blog post by Andrea Bryk, Registered Music Therapist, Peninsula Home Hospice

  • 25 August 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4864
  • 0 Comments
The Role of Music Therapy in Addressing Anxiety in Palliative Care – Part Two
Whilst there seems to be numerous barriers to overcoming anxiety, palliative clients, predictably, often have a vivid imagination and astute focus. The paradox is that some of the traits that can cause suffering can be used very productively on the other end of the spectrum to create a great sense of calm and well-being. Changing the focus from imagining what the future holds to noticing comfort in the present moment and redirecting attention to a space of safety and comfort is usually the key to decreasing anxiety [1]. Music therapy interventions, specifically the use of music based relaxation programs, can provide an anxious person the opportunity to experience peace in the moment [2].
After completing an assessment session, the client usually agrees to a live music relaxation trial. At this point I have ascertained the issues, problems, patterns and needs. Generally, I have identified the purpose for relaxation (e.g. to encourage sleep, to increase energy/vitality, clarity). The length of the intervention is discussed.

 

The Role of Music Therapy in Addressing Anxiety in Palliative Care – Part One

A guest blog post by Andrea Bryk, Registered Music Therapist, Peninsula Home Hospice

  • 24 August 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4844
  • 0 Comments
The Role of Music Therapy in Addressing Anxiety in Palliative Care – Part One
As a registered music therapist working in palliative care, [1, 2] one of the most common referrals is to address client anxiety.  Anxiety can present itself in many forms; loss of sleep, foggy thinking, or inability to focus. Anxiety amplifies many physiological symptoms such as shortness of breath, dizziness, and pain.

Psychologically, a client can be caught in a spiral of thinking about what lies in the future (reinforced by a schedule of medical appointments, treatment, scans, outcomes, follow-ups) and pondering questions that cannot be answered with any degree of certainty. So much focus is placed on the person's physical response to medical interventions while there is an unbalanced proportion of attention to the health of the mind. In addition, these clients can be living in an overstimulating environment or have a history of limited resilience building.
 

Dying to Know Day 2017: What if talking about death didn’t even raise an eyebrow?

A guest blog post by Holly Smith, Project Coordinator, The GroundSwell Project

  • 8 August 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4327
  • 0 Comments
Dying to Know Day 2017: What if talking about death didn’t even raise an eyebrow?

August 8th is Dying to Know Day – a campaign that encourages people across the country to engage in meaningful conversation around death, dying and loss by hosting events in their local area. This is its 5th year running and it has clocked up over 403 individual events!
 
So why on earth should we talk about death?!
 
Many cultures around the world have a different approach to death. In many countries, people generally die at home surrounded by their community, it is an important time for a community to gather and support each other. Death is not a scary thing to talk about because people have seen the process over their lifetime, they are familiar with the rituals and traditions so they know exactly what to expect and how to respond.

Reclaiming Dying and Death

A guest blog post by Robyn J.Youlten, Palliative Care and Bereavement Support Volunteer, Olivia Newton-John Cancer, Wellness and Research Centre, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia

  • 3 August 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3178
  • 0 Comments
Reclaiming Dying and Death

The 2017 MOOC global contributions saw a definite desire from people to reclaim dying and death - to be more personally involved in processes which are the natural progressions in life. There was a great sense of 'community' in the need for more knowledge about death, about illness and preparing for death.

Personally for me it drove home the great yawning chasm of a need to educate our health care professionals - to cut out the 'doctor speak' and learn how to talk about dying and death with patients and family. We need trailblazing medicos, astute advanced care planners and guidelines as more and more people wish to be able to die at home. We need a powerful innovative palliative care structure to facilitate people's needs to ensure comfort and safety at end of life.

 

Exploring Death and Dying in a New Online Conversation

A guest blog post by Catherine Munro, CNC End of Life Care Coordinator, Hunter New England Local Health District

  • 1 August 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 2673
  • 1 Comments
Exploring Death and Dying in a New Online Conversation

I really wasn’t sure what this Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on death and dying was going to look like but I dived in boots and all.
 
I am a nurse working as an End of Life Care Coordinator, so dead, death and dying are among the three most common words I use every day at work. I approached this course not only from a professional point of view but as a member of the community. I feel this made my experience so much richer, as I was able to appreciate the comments from across the board and indeed from across the world.

 

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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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