CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

End-of-life care needs of adults with long-standing physical disability

A guest blog post by Dr Ruth Walker, Head of Teaching Section (Applied Gerontology) and Senior Lecturer (Disability and Community Inclusion), College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University

  • 4 June 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 1351
  • 0 Comments
End-of-life care needs of adults with long-standing physical disability

Due to advances in medicine, people with physical disabilities are living longer. While end-of-life care should be readily accessible for this group, the care needs of people with significant physical disabilities arguably adds an additional layer of complexity to such care. Dr Ruth Walker from Flinders University discusses end-of-life care needs for adults with long-standing physical disability and the new research she is involved in to explore the specific needs of people with physical disabilities who are at the end-of-life, as well as the needs of their families and the support staff who help care for them.

General practitioner clinical decision making for patients with life-limiting illness: does the presence of complex multimorbidity make a difference?

A guest blog post by Raechel Damarell, PhD Candidate, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University

  • 9 April 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 1408
  • 0 Comments
General practitioner clinical decision making for patients with life-limiting illness: does the presence of complex multimorbidity make a difference?
As the Australian population ages, general practitioners are increasingly required to manage patients burdened by multiple chronic conditions, or 'multimorbidity'. Raechel Damarell, PhD Candidate at Flinders University discusses her PhD topic to investigate if the presence of complex multimorbidity influences the clinical decision making of general practitioners for patients with a life-limiting illness.

Family member experiences of the sudden, unexpected death of a loved one in an emergency department setting

A guest blog post by Dr Tracey Giles, Head of Teaching Section (Nursing), Flinders University

  • 4 May 2018
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4380
  • 0 Comments
Family member experiences of the sudden, unexpected death of a loved one in an emergency department setting

Health care professionals agree that the quality of care provided in the emergency department for dying patients and their families is often not as good as it needs to be. Dr Tracy Giles of Flinders University explains how her research into the experiences of family members will help to identify what is working well already and areas of care that need improvement, and how you can become involved.
 

Centre of Research Excellence in End-of-Life Care (CRE-ELC)

A guest blog post by Professor Patsy Yates, Centre Director, NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in End-of-life Care, Head, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology; Director, Centre for Palliative Care Research and Education

  • 28 March 2018
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4677
  • 0 Comments
Centre of Research Excellence in End-of-Life Care (CRE-ELC)

The pattern of disease, dying and death has changed dramatically in Australia over the last century. In Australia alone almost 160,000 people die every year. Of these at least 120,000 are expected deaths, meaning that access to palliative care could be of great benefit to both the individuals and their families. But ensuring access to quality palliative care for all who need it is not without its challenges. This is why a group of researchers sought funding from National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) for the Centre of Research Excellence in End-of-Life Care (CRE-ELC).

A new CareSearch Hub focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

A Guest Blog Post from Lauren Miller-Lewis, PhD. Research Associate, CareSearch, Flinders University

  • 14 June 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4536
  • 0 Comments
A new CareSearch Hub focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

At CareSearch we acknowledge and respect the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians whose ancestral lands on which CareSearch located.

Naa Marni? This greeting in Kaurna language translates to ‘Are you all good?’

I recall once walking through a university corridor on my way to give a tutorial, and overhearing some students complaining that they couldn't understand why they had to spend so much time in their course on Aboriginal Health. I was quite shocked by this, because to me the reason was obvious – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people die at least 10 years earlier than non-indigenous Australians. How had they missed this vital point?

One of the key goals of the Close the Gap campaign for Indigenous health equality is to reduce the gap in life expectancy and healthcare access between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the non-indigenous Australian population.
 

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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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