CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Less can be more: Researching non-beneficial treatment at the end-of-life

A guest blog post by Professor Adrian Barnett, Chief Investigator, InterACT Study and Professor of Statistics, Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation (AusHSI), Queensland University of Technology

  • 23 July 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 1083
  • 0 Comments
Less can be more: Researching non-beneficial treatment at the end-of-life

Advances in medicine mean health care professionals can prolong life, yet some treatments have a low chance of providing tangible benefits to some patients, can result in a ‘bad death’, and represent a multi-million dollar cost to the public. Professor Adrian Barnett from the Queensland University of Technology discusses the study he is involved in which looks to increase awareness among hospital clinicians of the extent of non-beneficial treatment at the end-of-life and stimulate action to reduce it.

Usability evaluation and online palliative care information resources

A guest blog post by Amanda Adams, PhD Candidate, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University

  • 16 July 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 615
  • 0 Comments
Usability evaluation and online palliative care information resources

The internet has provided a mechanism to make palliative care information freely accessible. However, the complexity of palliative care and situational stresses can influence a person’s ability to easily find, navigate and understand online information. It is for this reason that many developers of websites providing palliative care information conduct a usability evaluation during the development process. Amanda Adams discusses her research into evaluation of usability and accessibility during the development stage of an online resource or toolkit and whether this improves access and value.

The Advance Project – supporting a team approach to advance care planning and palliative care in everyday general practice

A guest blog post by Professor Josephine Clayton, Senior Staff Specialist Physician in Palliative Medicine, HammondCare and Professor of Palliative Care, University of Sydney and Associate Professor Joel Rhee, General Practitioner and Associate Professor of General Practice, HammondCare Centre for Positive Ageing and Care, University of Wollongong

  • 28 May 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 1098
  • 0 Comments
The Advance Project – supporting a team approach to advance care planning and palliative care in everyday general practice

General practices provide ongoing care for a large number of patients with chronic, progressive, and eventually fatal illnesses, and so have an essential role in providing palliative care to patients and their families. Professor Josephine Clayton, Senior Staff Specialist Physician in Palliative Medicine and Associate Professor Joel Rhee, General Practitioner, discusses the Advance Project and how it aims to support general practices with the tools to identify people early who might need a palliative approach to their care and enables general practice teams to thoroughly assess the persons’ symptoms, concerns and priorities as well as the needs of their carers.

Learning and vulnerability in end-of-life communication

A guest blog post by Kim Devery, Lead of End-of-Life Essentials, Senior Lecturer and Head of Teaching Section, Palliative Care, Flinders University

  • 6 November 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3453
  • 2 Comments
Learning and vulnerability in end-of-life communication

In spring each year, postgraduate students from all around Australia leave family and work responsibilities to spend 2 intensive days at Flinders University in Adelaide. These professionals come to interact with peers and facilitators to learn more about communication at the end of life, the topic covered as core in all of our courses. 

Communication, the cornerstone of excellent end-of-life care, is that delicate skill that can flourish in the fertile environment of mindful practice and supportive critique. 

Supporting lay carers to provide palliative symptom management

A guest blog post from Professor Liz Reymond, Director, Brisbane South Palliative Care Collaborative

  • 23 October 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4207
  • 0 Comments
Supporting lay carers to provide palliative symptom management
The aim of modern palliative care, whether provided by generalist, or specialist service providers, is to support palliative patients to live and die within the context of their lives, in the setting of their choice, with symptom control and a pattern of care that is supportive of patients’ caregivers.

Most Australian palliative care patients prefer to be cared for at home and the majority want to die at home, though only about 16% of Australians achieve that wish [1]. While there is no nationally consistent data on the volume of community services providing palliative care, it is known to be limited [2].

 
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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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