Support for health professionals to know more about end-of-life law

A guest blog post by Professor Ben White and Professor Lindy Willmott, Directors, Australian Centre for Health Law Research, Faculty of Law, QUT

  • 19 April 2018
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3269
  • 0 Comments
Support for health professionals to know more about end-of-life law

One part of advance care planning that is often unseen is law. Yet law plays an important role in end-of-life care. Professor Ben White and Professor Lindy Willmott from Queensland University of Technology explains the legal aspects of planning for advance care and end of life, and how the Australian Centre for Health Law Research supports health professionals.  
 

Listen, pause, and breathe – guidance in delivering culturally acceptable palliative care

A guest blog post by Charlotte Coulson, Clinical Nurse Consultant, Integrated Palliative Care Team, Bendigo Health

  • 3 April 2018
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 5249
  • 1 Comments
Listen, pause, and breathe – guidance in delivering culturally acceptable palliative care
A culturally acceptable approach is crucial to delivering quality person-centred palliative care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. But what if you are someone from a different cultural background? Charlotte Coulson from Bendigo Health shares her experience as a nurse and some pointers.

Preparing for the future by learning from the present

A guest blog post by Robyn McLean, RNR, Residential Aged Care Manager

  • 24 May 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4518
  • 1 Comments
Preparing for the future by learning from the present

In my role managing two aged care homes in Melbourne, I have come across a number of challenges which needed to be overcome. I took over one home four and a half years ago and the second 18 months ago, discovering the same basic issues in each home; after the first time, the issues were relatively easy to change. Staff were fractured in the sense that departments did not necessarily rely on each other and work together, and knowledge of clinical issues was only handed over to clinical staff, not to the whole home (not an unusual happening). My idea of sharing with all staff was greeted with a degree of scepticism at first, but staff embraced it quite quickly and then started to discuss things across different departments.

Learning how to recognise end of life

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 5 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4674
  • 1 Comments
Learning how to recognise end of life

With 52% of Australians dying in acute hospitals, end-of-life care is essential knowledge for health care professionals.

However, health care professionals working in acute hospitals can find themselves challenged by patients with end-of-life care needs. Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can be in a situation where they do not know how to best respond to a patient with end-of-life needs. Appropriate end-of-life interventions can be missed.

End-of-Life Education Matters

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 7 June 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4777
  • 0 Comments
End-of-Life Education Matters

As a course coordinator of the palliative care courses at Flinders University I have seen our post graduate student population change over time. Ten years ago, students were primarily health professionals who worked in specialist palliative care services. These students worked to expand and update their knowledge, sharpen their skills and improve their own professional capacity to deliver palliative care. 

Today Flinders’ students still work to grow, change and develop, but the student profile is changing. We work with students who are employed across a range of health services including, aged care, emergency departments, pain clinics, medical wards, adult and neonatal intensive care units, and respiratory wards. These professionals are proactively seeking to expand their skills to meet the needs of the growing number of Australians (up to 52%) with a life-limiting illness and who die in acute hospitals. 
 

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