Lessons learnt from education in paediatric palliative care - the QuoCCA project

A guest blog post by Dr Anthony Herbert, Director, Paediatric Palliative Care Service, Division Medicine, Queensland Children's Hospital

  • 5 December 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 1507
  • 0 Comments
Lessons learnt from education in paediatric palliative care - the QuoCCA project

The Quality of Care Collaborative Australia (QuoCCA) project delivers paediatric palliative care education to health professionals in urban, rural, regional, and remote areas. QuoCCA Lead Dr Anthony Herbert from Queensland Children's Hospital discusses some of the findings from their research evaluating the project, including innovative ways in delivering paediatric palliative care education.

Broadening the role of paramedics in palliative care

A guest blog post by Madeleine Juhrmann, Policy Officer, HammondCare

  • 30 October 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 2043
  • 0 Comments
Broadening the role of paramedics in palliative care

Paramedics’ scope of practice has traditionally been limited to providing life-sustaining interventions for acute emergencies. But they also have the unique potential to support and fulfil the wishes of dying patients who prefer to spend their end of life at home. In this blog, Madeleine Juhrmann of HammondCare discusses how the role of paramedics in palliative care can be broadened and provides some example initiatives. 

How a practice change toolkit can improve end of life care in hospitals

A guest blog post by Deb Rawlings, Co-Investigator and Jane Durbridge, Marketing and Communications Coordinator, End-of-Life Essentials

  • 23 October 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 1010
  • 0 Comments
How a practice change toolkit can improve end of life care in hospitals

Health professionals working in hospitals are faced with several barriers when implementing evidence based practice in end-of-life care, including the amount of evidence to read and the lack of time to appraise it. To help overcome these barriers, Deb Rawlings and Jane Durbridge from the End-of-Life Essentials project discuss how a free practice change toolkit can assist in bringing about positive changes at the point of care.

The ELDAC Residential Aged Care Toolkit: Assisting the transition to the Aged Care Quality Standards

A guest blog by Professor Deborah Parker, Professor of Aged Care (Dementia) and Dr Holly Mack, Research Fellow, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney

  • 17 June 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 3203
  • 0 Comments
The ELDAC Residential Aged Care Toolkit: Assisting the transition to the Aged Care Quality Standards

Providing end-of-life care to residents with advanced life-limiting illnesses can be challenging for clinicians and health care workers. In this blog, Professor Deborah Parker and Dr Holly Mack from the University of Technology Sydney discuss how the ELDAC Residential Aged Care toolkit can assist you and your organisation in meeting the new Aged Care Quality Standards.

End-of-life care needs of adults with long-standing physical disability

A guest blog post by Dr Ruth Walker, Head of Teaching Section (Applied Gerontology) and Senior Lecturer (Disability and Community Inclusion), College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University

  • 4 June 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 1638
  • 0 Comments
End-of-life care needs of adults with long-standing physical disability

Due to advances in medicine, people with physical disabilities are living longer. While end-of-life care should be readily accessible for this group, the care needs of people with significant physical disabilities arguably adds an additional layer of complexity to such care. Dr Ruth Walker from Flinders University discusses end-of-life care needs for adults with long-standing physical disability and the new research she is involved in to explore the specific needs of people with physical disabilities who are at the end-of-life, as well as the needs of their families and the support staff who help care for them.

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