CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Improving Children’s Palliative Care Close to Home in Australia

A guest blog post from Dr Anthony Herbert, Director, Paediatric Palliative Care Service, Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, Brisbane and Project Lead, Quality of Care Collaborative of Australia for Paediatric Palliative Care Education (QuoCCA)

  • 16 August 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 6287
  • 1 Comments
Improving Children’s Palliative Care Close to Home in Australia
Children’s palliative care shares many of the principles of palliative care that is provided to adults.  However, there are unique aspects of the care provided in looking after a child with a life limiting illness.  This includes children diagnosed with cancer and non-cancer diagnoses from infancy to young adulthood.  We are also providing this care working with the children’s family (parents, siblings, grandparents) and the broader community (including schools).

The goal of our project is to deliver education in paediatric palliative care in areas outside of the metropolitan centres of Australia, and in all states and territories of Australia.  This reflects the geographic diversity of Australia, with many patients living outside of capital cities, and also large distances between centres.  The anticipated outcome of this education is greater confidence of health professionals to care for dying children, and improved quality of care.

 

PCACE Project: Developing and maintaining guidance for palliative care in aged care

A guest blog post from Dr Jennifer Tieman, CareSearch Director, Associate Professor, Discipline Palliative and Supportive Services

  • 9 August 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4559
  • 2 Comments
PCACE Project: Developing and maintaining guidance for palliative care in aged care

The release of the Guidelines for a Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care (APRAC) and the Guidelines for a Palliative Approach for Aged Care in the Community Setting (COMPAC) were a significant advance in recognising and responding to changing population demography in Australia.  They aimed to support the provision of palliative care for older people living in the community or in residential aged care by identifying and evaluating the evidence for care to promote quality of life for older Australians who have a life-limiting illness or who are becoming progressively frailer during old age. The two sets of guidelines were important landmarks nationally and internationally. 
 

‘What is needed to improve care planning for people living with dementia?’

A guest blog post from Tim Luckett PhD, Senior Research Fellow, University of Technology Sydney and Ingrid Duff, Research Assistant, Centre for Cardiovascular and Chronic Care

  • 19 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 9125
  • 2 Comments
‘What is needed to improve care planning for people living with dementia?’

During National Palliative Care Week, the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) hosted a forum on dementia care planning facilitated by the Director of The Centre for Cardiovascular and Chronic Care, Faculty of Health, Professor Jane Phillips. Imelda Gilmore, an Alzheimer’s Australia NSW Dementia Advocate and wife of a person with dementia, opened the forum by highlighting the importance of “getting the word out to have conversations about end of life early on”. A recurring theme at the forum was the need for care decisions to be person-centred and focused on what the person with dementia would have wanted were they able to speak for themselves, rather than the wishes of surrogate decision-makers. Lynn Chenoweth (Professor of Nursing at the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, The University of New South Wales) defined person-centredness as respecting the person with dementia’s “values, beliefs, history, likes and dislikes … all of the things that make them unique”.

Palliative Care Workforce Development

A guest blog post from Kylie Ash and Professor Patsy Yates, Queensland University of Technology

  • 12 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 5939
  • 0 Comments
Palliative Care Workforce Development

“Palliative care is everyone’s business”
This was the theme of Palliative Care Australia’s advocacy in 2013. While this message aimed primarily to promote understanding at the wider community level, it is important for all health care providers to recognise the role they play in palliative care. All health disciplines, in specialist and non-specialist roles, in acute, community and aged care settings, cross paths with people affected by life-limiting illnesses. To provide care reflecting the values and principles of palliative care, the health workforce needs to be appropriately prepared and updated through postgraduate learning, professional experience, and ongoing professional development.

Learning how to recognise end of life

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 5 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4678
  • 1 Comments
Learning how to recognise end of life

With 52% of Australians dying in acute hospitals, end-of-life care is essential knowledge for health care professionals.

However, health care professionals working in acute hospitals can find themselves challenged by patients with end-of-life care needs. Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can be in a situation where they do not know how to best respond to a patient with end-of-life needs. Appropriate end-of-life interventions can be missed.

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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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