CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Palliative Care Workforce Development

A guest blog post from Kylie Ash and Professor Patsy Yates, Queensland University of Technology

  • 12 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4987
  • 0 Comments
Palliative Care Workforce Development
“Palliative care is everyone’s business”
This was the theme of Palliative Care Australia’s advocacy in 2013. While this message aimed primarily to promote understanding at the wider community level, it is important for all health care providers to recognise the role they play in palliative care. All health disciplines, in specialist and non-specialist roles, in acute, community and aged care settings, cross paths with people affected by life-limiting illnesses. To provide care reflecting the values and principles of palliative care, the health workforce needs to be appropriately prepared and updated through postgraduate learning, professional experience, and ongoing professional development.

Learning how to recognise end of life

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 5 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3998
  • 1 Comments
Learning how to recognise end of life

With 52% of Australians dying in acute hospitals, end-of-life care is essential knowledge for health care professionals.

However, health care professionals working in acute hospitals can find themselves challenged by patients with end-of-life care needs. Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can be in a situation where they do not know how to best respond to a patient with end-of-life needs. Appropriate end-of-life interventions can be missed.

End-of-Life Education Matters

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 7 June 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4022
  • 0 Comments
End-of-Life Education Matters

As a course coordinator of the palliative care courses at Flinders University I have seen our post graduate student population change over time. Ten years ago, students were primarily health professionals who worked in specialist palliative care services. These students worked to expand and update their knowledge, sharpen their skills and improve their own professional capacity to deliver palliative care. 

Today Flinders’ students still work to grow, change and develop, but the student profile is changing. We work with students who are employed across a range of health services including, aged care, emergency departments, pain clinics, medical wards, adult and neonatal intensive care units, and respiratory wards. These professionals are proactively seeking to expand their skills to meet the needs of the growing number of Australians (up to 52%) with a life-limiting illness and who die in acute hospitals. 
 

Knowledge translation in end-of-life care: a new My Learning module on moving evidence from page to practice

A guest blog post from Raechel Damarell, Research Librarian, CRE ELC and CareSearch, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 24 May 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4730
  • 0 Comments
Knowledge translation in end-of-life care: a new My Learning module on moving evidence from page to practice

New healthcare research is being produced at an exponential rate and the challenges for clinicians to keep abreast of it are well documented. Perhaps less frequently discussed is the question of what happens once relevant evidence has been identified. How does it move from the page to have a tangible influence on patient care or health system outcomes?  

Despite the abundance of research evidence available, we know that it is often slow to reach those that need it, and even slower to be implemented. An oft cited time lag is a staggering 17 years! The implication is that patients may be receiving ineffectual treatments, out of step with best practice recommendation, in the meantime. This must inevitably impact on patient safety, quality improvement processes, and healthcare costs across the sector. 
 

My Learning: Modules on how evidence can help in practice

A guest blog post from Erin McAllister, Marketing and Communications Manager, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 29 March 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4073
  • 0 Comments
My Learning: Modules on how evidence can help in practice

Health professionals can find it difficult to manage the growing evidence relevant to the care of patients with palliative care needs. While CareSearch provides access to a wide variety of palliative care evidence and resources, knowing which one to use can be tricky. Recognising when it might be worthwhile looking for additional evidence is also important. These were the original reasons why we introduced My Learning, a web-based learning initiative, in 2012.  Educational modules in My Learning introduced health professionals to resources in CareSearch and showed how they could help in clinical care and decision making. Since then, each month, around 100 people complete the learning modules.
 

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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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