CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Free palliative care online training helping people live well with chronic illness

A guest blog post from Alison Verhoeven, Chief Executive, Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association

  • 7 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4246
  • 2 Comments
Free palliative care online training helping people live well with chronic illness
Palliative Care has become widely recognised as one of the most vital disciplines in Australian health, with our ageing population and increasingly effective medical treatments bringing about longer and longer final care stages of life.

Palliative care can be an awkward subject to broach – it is difficult to talk about death. However, given our ageing population and our rising rates of chronic and complex disease, including increasing instances of multiple morbidities, these discussions have never been more important and following the discussion, we must meet the growing need for carers with palliative care skills.

 

Listen, Acknowledge, Respond: Addressing the mental health needs of those living with dying

A guest blog post from the Listen Acknowledge Respond project team: Julianne Whyte, CEO, Amaranth Foundation, Janelle Wheat, Associate Dean Academic, Charles Sturt University, Janelle Thomas, Research Officer and Kirsty Smith, Project Manager, Listen, Acknowledge, Respond, Charles Sturt University

  • 30 August 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3315
  • 1 Comments
Listen, Acknowledge, Respond: Addressing the mental health needs of those living with dying

Mental health and palliative care patients: the “treatment gap”
Sadness, social withdrawal, depression, loss of hope; if a non-palliative person experiences any of these feelings, the health care system has well established processes and services to treat them. Why then do we accept this as ‘normal’ and ‘to be expected’ for those facing the end of life? Why does the system hesitate to ‘label’ these vulnerable people with a mental illness tag?

Mental illness in the terminally ill is too often underdiagnosed and undertreated. It’s frequently ignored – “well of course you’re having trouble coping, you’re dying,” – or pushed aside in favour of addressing clinical symptoms. While existential and psychological care is acknowledged as being crucial to providing quality end of life care, people continually report that theirs, their families and care givers needs in this domain are not addressed.

 

Palliative Care Workforce Development

A guest blog post from Kylie Ash and Professor Patsy Yates, Queensland University of Technology

  • 12 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4760
  • 0 Comments
Palliative Care Workforce Development
“Palliative care is everyone’s business”
This was the theme of Palliative Care Australia’s advocacy in 2013. While this message aimed primarily to promote understanding at the wider community level, it is important for all health care providers to recognise the role they play in palliative care. All health disciplines, in specialist and non-specialist roles, in acute, community and aged care settings, cross paths with people affected by life-limiting illnesses. To provide care reflecting the values and principles of palliative care, the health workforce needs to be appropriately prepared and updated through postgraduate learning, professional experience, and ongoing professional development.

Learning how to recognise end of life

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 5 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3853
  • 1 Comments
Learning how to recognise end of life

With 52% of Australians dying in acute hospitals, end-of-life care is essential knowledge for health care professionals.

However, health care professionals working in acute hospitals can find themselves challenged by patients with end-of-life care needs. Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can be in a situation where they do not know how to best respond to a patient with end-of-life needs. Appropriate end-of-life interventions can be missed.

End-of-Life Education Matters

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 7 June 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3832
  • 0 Comments
End-of-Life Education Matters

As a course coordinator of the palliative care courses at Flinders University I have seen our post graduate student population change over time. Ten years ago, students were primarily health professionals who worked in specialist palliative care services. These students worked to expand and update their knowledge, sharpen their skills and improve their own professional capacity to deliver palliative care. 

Today Flinders’ students still work to grow, change and develop, but the student profile is changing. We work with students who are employed across a range of health services including, aged care, emergency departments, pain clinics, medical wards, adult and neonatal intensive care units, and respiratory wards. These professionals are proactively seeking to expand their skills to meet the needs of the growing number of Australians (up to 52%) with a life-limiting illness and who die in acute hospitals. 
 

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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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