CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Knowledge translation in end-of-life care: a new My Learning module on moving evidence from page to practice

A guest blog post from Raechel Damarell, Research Librarian, CRE ELC and CareSearch, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 24 May 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 5207
  • 0 Comments
Knowledge translation in end-of-life care: a new My Learning module on moving evidence from page to practice

New healthcare research is being produced at an exponential rate and the challenges for clinicians to keep abreast of it are well documented. Perhaps less frequently discussed is the question of what happens once relevant evidence has been identified. How does it move from the page to have a tangible influence on patient care or health system outcomes?  

Despite the abundance of research evidence available, we know that it is often slow to reach those that need it, and even slower to be implemented. An oft cited time lag is a staggering 17 years! The implication is that patients may be receiving ineffectual treatments, out of step with best practice recommendation, in the meantime. This must inevitably impact on patient safety, quality improvement processes, and healthcare costs across the sector. 
 

What its like to be a Research Nurse in Southern Adelaide Palliative Services

A Guest Blog Post from Vera Margitanovic, Research CN in Palliative Care, Southern Adelaide Palliative Services

  • 17 May 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4271
  • 0 Comments
What its like to be a Research Nurse in Southern Adelaide Palliative Services

Reflecting on what I do and what my responsibilities are as a Research Nurse is quite complex and one single role cannot encompass all the activities associated with clinical research trials.

Protocol development is the first phase of the project, where a team is involved in developing the protocol. From my perspective, knowledge and experience of a research nurse is indispensable in creating a good balance between the needs of the research and the patients involved.

 

Passion, Commitment and Tenacity: nursing, research and improving health care

A Guest Blog Post from Dr Aileen Collier, Lecturer in Palliative and Supportives Services, Flinders University

  • 19 April 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 6445
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Passion, Commitment and Tenacity: nursing, research and improving health care

Aileen Collier is a lecturer in Palliative and Supportive Services, Flinders University. Her research sits at the interface of social science and health research and is focused on human agency and safety and quality of palliative care. She also teaches in the Flinders University post-graduate program.

What advice can I offer you about nursing, research and improving health care?  Nurses, as the backbone of our health services, need to be highly responsive to direct patient care needs. If improvements in palliative care are to be realised however, we also need to enact what colleagues Jane Phillips and Meera Agar have recently described as “exemplary leadership”.  Our health care systems are complex, in constant flux and driven by efficiency and cost effectiveness.  We need to take an active role in policy development as well as critically adapting ‘top-down’ policy and evidence-based initiatives within local settings. In this environment, nurses simply cannot afford not to be able to make sense of research findings.
 

What is Grey Literature?

A guest blog post from Andrew Lyons-Reid, Literature Collections Assistant, CareSearch, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 22 March 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 6062
  • 0 Comments
What is Grey Literature?

The Fourth International Conference on Grey Literature (GL '99) in Washington, DC, in October 1999 defined grey literature as ‘that which is produced on all levels of government, academics, business and industry in print and electronic formats, but which is not controlled by commercial publishers’.

Grey literature can include material that is not conventionally published and may be hard to find and sometimes ephemeral. It is not indexed formally in major databases and requires general web searching using a search engine such as Google. It can include such items as government reports and documents, state-of-the art reports, market research reports, theses, conference papers, technical specifications, and standards.
 

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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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