CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

National Standards Assessment Program (NSAP)

A guest blog post by Lauren Ognenovski, NSAP Project Officer and Policy and Community Engagement Officer, Palliative Care Australia

  • 5 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3880
  • 0 Comments
National Standards Assessment Program (NSAP)
The National Standards Assessment Program (NSAP) is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and administered by Palliative Care Australia (PCA). NSAP has been running since 2008 and is a quality improvement program available for all specialist palliative care services in Australia.

NSAP aims to improve outcomes in palliative care and end-of-life care at a systematic level by providing a structured program for services. The structured 2-year NSAP cycle enables specialist palliative care services to enhance the quality of their governance and service delivery by:
  • Reviewing how they meet the National Palliative Care Standards (the standards)
  • Prioritising key improvement areas so they can better meet the standards
  • Developing and implementing a quality improvement action plan

“Something vital was missing throughout that process for Maria and her family.”

A guest blog post by Dr Joel Rhee BSc(Med) MBBS(Hons) GradCert(ULT) PhD, FRACGP

  • 27 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4251
  • 1 Comments
“Something vital was missing throughout that process for Maria and her family.”
I remember a patient some years ago. I’ll call her Maria. She was a lovely Italian woman, in her late 80’s, with a very supportive family.
 
Maria had developed very complex medical problems. She had heart issues, kidney problems and quite severe diabetes. In the last year of her life she had recurring kidney failure and breathing difficulties. She was going in and out of hospital every three or four weeks.
 
The medical team did their very best for her – they were very focused on her medical issues and her symptoms, and she received excellent medical care. A lot of focus was given to how best to look after her kidneys, her heart, her pain and her difficulty with breathing. As her problems multiplied and her needs became increasingly complex, the care she received continued to be excellent.

 

A Rewarding Place to Work: My Personal Perspective on Paediatric Palliative Care (PPC)

A guest blog post from Elizabeth Shepherd, Program Development and Quality Manager, Palliative Care at Sydney Children's Hospital Network

  • 21 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3602
  • 0 Comments
A Rewarding Place to Work: My Personal Perspective on Paediatric Palliative Care (PPC)
My name is Elizabeth Shepherd and I am the Program Development and Quality Manager for Palliative Care at the Sydney Children’s Hospital Network. Working within this specialised area can be challenging and emotional, however, it can also be very rewarding. My position allows me to work closely with the 3 specialist PPC teams located at Children’s Hospital Westmead, Sydney Children’s Hospital Randwick and John Hunter Children’s Hospital, Newcastle. Together we are known as The NSW PPC Programme and over the past 5 years I have been fortunate to work with the energetic and dedicated staff from each service to improve the support that is available to children and families across NSW.
 

PaCCSC RAPID Pharmacovigilance program

A guest blog post from Linda Devilee, National Manager, PaCCSC

  • 13 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4046
  • 1 Comments
PaCCSC RAPID Pharmacovigilance program
The Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative (PaCCSC) is a national research network that has two main aims:
1. Firstly, to generate high quality research evidence to support the use of medicines and other interventions at the end of life to better manage or alleviate symptoms. 
2. Secondly, to build capacity and embed research within the health workforce to enable the conduct of high quality clinical research and the uptake of new evidence into clinical practice.

Free palliative care online training helping people live well with chronic illness

A guest blog post from Alison Verhoeven, Chief Executive, Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association

  • 7 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4530
  • 2 Comments
Free palliative care online training helping people live well with chronic illness
Palliative Care has become widely recognised as one of the most vital disciplines in Australian health, with our ageing population and increasingly effective medical treatments bringing about longer and longer final care stages of life.

Palliative care can be an awkward subject to broach – it is difficult to talk about death. However, given our ageing population and our rising rates of chronic and complex disease, including increasing instances of multiple morbidities, these discussions have never been more important and following the discussion, we must meet the growing need for carers with palliative care skills.

 
12345

About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

Keep me up to date