CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

What is the relationship between good advocacy services and good palliative care?

A guest blog post by Lewis Kaplan, former CEO, Older Persons Advocacy Network (OPAN)

  • 28 August 2018
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 6757
  • 0 Comments
What is the relationship between good advocacy services and good palliative care?

Older Persons Advocacy Network (OPAN) manages the National Aged Care Advocacy Program. OPAN provides information, education and free, confidential individual advocacy to both community and residential aged care and potential consumers, their carers and families. Lewis Kaplan, former CEO of OPAN, discusses what is the relationship between good advocacy services and good palliative care.

Bringing conversations about death to life through online learning

A blog post by Dr Lauren Miller-Lewis, CareSearch Research Associate, Flinders University

  • 8 August 2018
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 1967
  • 0 Comments
Bringing conversations about death to life through online learning

Have you ever tried to broach the topic of end-of-life wishes with a loved one and been met with stunned silence? People often report this kind of experience, and research indicates that many people are uncomfortable with discussing death and dying. This leaves many Australians unprepared for death and the decisions that need to be made when a person is dying. Dr Lauren Miller-Lewis discusses the importance of bringing conversations about death to life through online learning. 

Online health information - a valuable currency

A guest blog post by Dr Georgia Rowley, Research Associate, ELDAC Project, Flinders University

  • 16 July 2018
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 2239
  • 0 Comments
Online health information - a valuable currency

Online health information is available and accessible almost instantaneously; in Australia this is true for most individuals with internet connections, from any digital device. Sourcing evidence-based research and information regarding health is crucial in informing decision making, improving knowledge and skills, and guiding service choices and clinical practice for health professionals and care workers. Virtual health resources are widely used in clinical care settings; individuals routinely search online for answers to health-related queries, which may assist their ability to appropriately service others in their care. For individuals working in aged care, accessing online information facilitates timely answers to their queries or may contribute to their ongoing professional education. Health professionals and care workers are also well-positioned to refer their clients or patients to trustworthy, reputable, and up-to-date online health resources.
 

Learning and vulnerability in end-of-life communication

A guest blog post by Kim Devery, Lead of End-of-Life Essentials, Senior Lecturer and Head of Teaching Section, Palliative Care, Flinders University

  • 6 November 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3797
  • 2 Comments
Learning and vulnerability in end-of-life communication

In spring each year, postgraduate students from all around Australia leave family and work responsibilities to spend 2 intensive days at Flinders University in Adelaide. These professionals come to interact with peers and facilitators to learn more about communication at the end of life, the topic covered as core in all of our courses. 

Communication, the cornerstone of excellent end-of-life care, is that delicate skill that can flourish in the fertile environment of mindful practice and supportive critique. 

Now there is specialised support and training for Australian GP nurses to provide better care at a very difficult time

A guest blog post by Associate Professor Josephine Clayton, Specialist Physician in Palliative Medicine at HammondCare’s Greenwich Hospital in Sydney, Associate Professor of Palliative Care at the University of Sydney and Director of the Advance Project

  • 2 December 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4027
  • 0 Comments
Now there is specialised support and training for Australian GP nurses to provide better care at a very difficult time
As a young doctor I spent some time working in a palliative care hospital in the early 90’s.  It was such a privilege to be working with people at end of life - with the opportunity to make a difference to quality of life and well-being of patients, and their family members. That experience made me decide to devote my career to Palliative Medicine.
 
I had some experiences at that time that stayed with me.
 
I had a patient, Marion, who had been a school principal. Marion had suffered a severe stroke. She had survived but was very incapacitated, confined to bed and unable to communicate. She was being kept alive, surviving on a feeding tube, and facing a life of care and dependence. Her specialist was very committed to her survival.

 
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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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