CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Reflections of my time in Daw House

A guest blog post by Sharenne Codrington, ANUM, Laurel Hospice

  • 18 December 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 6777
  • 6 Comments
Reflections of my time in Daw House

I started out my career as an enrolled nurse and after a few short term positions spent 21 years at Ashford Hospital.  While I was there and aged about 33, my brother died after a short diagnosis of cancer at age 35 – way too young and with much still to give.  He spent a few weeks in Daw House hospice – my introduction to this facility and palliative care.  I was so inspired with the way care could be delivered and the compassion with which staff went about their work that I decided then and there that this was the way I wished to work going forward.  I learnt that, at that time, there was no hope of employment at Daw House for an enrolled nurse, so decided that I would study to become a registered nurse to realise my desire to work in this field. 

Supporting lay carers to provide palliative symptom management

A guest blog post from Professor Liz Reymond, Director, Brisbane South Palliative Care Collaborative

  • 23 October 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 5071
  • 0 Comments
Supporting lay carers to provide palliative symptom management

The aim of modern palliative care, whether provided by generalist, or specialist service providers, is to support palliative patients to live and die within the context of their lives, in the setting of their choice, with symptom control and a pattern of care that is supportive of patients’ caregivers.

Most Australian palliative care patients prefer to be cared for at home and the majority want to die at home, though only about 16% of Australians achieve that wish [1]. While there is no nationally consistent data on the volume of community services providing palliative care, it is known to be limited [2].

 

PaCCSC RAPID Pharmacovigilance program

A guest blog post from Linda Devilee, National Manager, PaCCSC

  • 13 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4918
  • 1 Comments
PaCCSC RAPID Pharmacovigilance program

The Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative (PaCCSC) is a national research network that has two main aims:

1. Firstly, to generate high quality research evidence to support the use of medicines and other interventions at the end of life to better manage or alleviate symptoms. 
2. Secondly, to build capacity and embed research within the health workforce to enable the conduct of high quality clinical research and the uptake of new evidence into clinical practice.

Learning how to recognise end of life

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 5 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4538
  • 1 Comments
Learning how to recognise end of life

With 52% of Australians dying in acute hospitals, end-of-life care is essential knowledge for health care professionals.

However, health care professionals working in acute hospitals can find themselves challenged by patients with end-of-life care needs. Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can be in a situation where they do not know how to best respond to a patient with end-of-life needs. Appropriate end-of-life interventions can be missed.

What its like to be a Research Nurse in Southern Adelaide Palliative Services

A Guest Blog Post from Vera Margitanovic, Research CN in Palliative Care, Southern Adelaide Palliative Services

  • 17 May 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4340
  • 0 Comments
What its like to be a Research Nurse in Southern Adelaide Palliative Services

Reflecting on what I do and what my responsibilities are as a Research Nurse is quite complex and one single role cannot encompass all the activities associated with clinical research trials.

Protocol development is the first phase of the project, where a team is involved in developing the protocol. From my perspective, knowledge and experience of a research nurse is indispensable in creating a good balance between the needs of the research and the patients involved.

 

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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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