CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Addressing nurses’ fears of legal risks when providing end-of-life pain relief

A guest post by Dr Katrin Gerber, Professor Lindy Willmott, Professor Ben White, and Distinguished Professor Patsy Yates from Queensland University of Technology

  • 8 July 2020
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 609
  • 2 Comments
Addressing nurses’ fears of legal risks when providing end-of-life pain relief

Some patients do not receive adequate pain and symptom relief at the end of life, causing distress to patients, families and healthcare professionals. It is unclear whether undertreatment of symptoms occurs, in part, because of nurses' concerns about legal and/or disciplinary repercussions if the patient dies after medication is administered. Dr Katrin Gerber, Professor Lindy Willmott, Professor Ben White, and Distinguished Professor Patsy Yates from Queensland University of Technology discuss the findings from their research and interviews with nurses from different clinical backgrounds and settings about their concerns when providing pain and symptom relief to patients near the end of life.

Brilliant Palliative Care

A guest blog post by Dr Aileen Collier at Department of Nursing, University of Auckland, Associate Professor Ann Dadich at School of Business, Western Sydney University, Ms Catherine Jeffs and Professor Gregory Crawford at Northern Adelaide Palliative Service, SA Health

  • 1 April 2020
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 986
  • 0 Comments
Brilliant Palliative Care

There have been many changes around how to care for others since the outbreak of COVID-19. These changes can compromise the wellbeing of people who receive and deliver palliative care. Hence it has never been more important to undertake research into understanding what is quality – and brilliant - palliative care. Dr Aileen Collier, Associate Professor Ann Dadich, Ms Catherine Jeffs and Professor Gregory Crawford discuss the findings of their research into enabling and sustaining brilliant palliative care.

Where does fundamental care fit within palliative care?

A guest blog post by Professor Alison Kitson, Vice-President and Executive Dean, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University; Foundational Director and Knowledge Translation Lead, Caring Futures Institute, Flinders University

  • 12 March 2020
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 406
  • 0 Comments
Where does fundamental care fit within palliative care?

Fundamental care is central to caring for a dying patient. Professor Alison Kitson, Vice-President and Executive Dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences at Flinders University, discusses the need to develop better ways of delivering fundamental care for patients in palliative care, and the aims of the Fundamentals of Care Research Program at the Caring Futures Institute.

Self-management of arthritic pain for older people in the community: Do Apps have a role to play?

A guest blog post by Priyanka Bhattarai, Research Associate, ELDAC (End-of-Life Directions for Aged Care)

  • 30 July 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 1162
  • 0 Comments
Self-management of arthritic pain for older people in the community: Do Apps have a role to play?

Technological advances are enabling the integration of mobile healthcare Apps into the self-management plans for people living with various chronic and complex conditions. Priyanka Bhattarai discusses her research into investigating if self-management Apps are a feasible and acceptable modality to assist older people in the community to better manage their arthritic pain. The potential extension of this to palliative care is also discussed.

Less can be more: Researching non-beneficial treatment at the end-of-life

A guest blog post by Professor Adrian Barnett, Chief Investigator, InterACT Study and Professor of Statistics, Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation (AusHSI), Queensland University of Technology

  • 23 July 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 2337
  • 0 Comments
Less can be more: Researching non-beneficial treatment at the end-of-life

Advances in medicine mean health care professionals can prolong life, yet some treatments have a low chance of providing tangible benefits to some patients, can result in a ‘bad death’, and represent a multi-million dollar cost to the public. Professor Adrian Barnett from the Queensland University of Technology discusses the study he is involved in which looks to increase awareness among hospital clinicians of the extent of non-beneficial treatment at the end-of-life and stimulate action to reduce it.

123

About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

Keep me up to date