CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

How a practice change toolkit can improve end of life care in hospitals

A guest blog post by Deb Rawlings, Co-Investigator and Jane Durbridge, Marketing and Communications Coordinator, End-of-Life Essentials

  • 23 October 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 336
  • 0 Comments
How a practice change toolkit can improve end of life care in hospitals

Health professionals working in hospitals are faced with several barriers when implementing evidence based practice in end-of-life care, including the amount of evidence to read and the lack of time to appraise it. To help overcome these barriers, Deb Rawlings and Jane Durbridge from the End-of-Life Essentials project discuss how a free practice change toolkit can assist in bringing about positive changes at the point of care.

Learning how to recognise end of life

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 5 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4006
  • 1 Comments
Learning how to recognise end of life

With 52% of Australians dying in acute hospitals, end-of-life care is essential knowledge for health care professionals.

However, health care professionals working in acute hospitals can find themselves challenged by patients with end-of-life care needs. Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can be in a situation where they do not know how to best respond to a patient with end-of-life needs. Appropriate end-of-life interventions can be missed.

If death is the problem, is medicine the answer...?

A guest blog from Associate Professor Christine Sanderson, Clinical Research Fellow, University of Notre Dame Australia / Calvary Health Care Kogarah / CareSearch

  • 29 June 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3529
  • 1 Comments
If death is the problem, is medicine the answer...?

This is one of the questions that will be addressed in the Dying2Learn MOOC. As a palliative care doctor, it has been wonderful to have the opportunity to start this conversation, and I am looking forward to the interactions with real anticipation.

In developing this section of the MOOC I have tried hard not to assume too much about what participants should think or believe, or to push any particular perspective. Obviously that is a bit difficult for me, as my work for over a decade has been in the smoke and dust of the clinical battlefields where dying patients often end up i.e. acute hospitals. As palliative medicine clinicians we often feel like we are galloping in to rescue people from the hospital system, and (speaking for myself, anyhow) we can sometimes be a bit black and white about things. What I have learned though, over and over again, is that it is not simple for people. Many are unprepared for the decisions they will need to make, and - like BREXIT perhaps!- may not fully understand what they have let themselves in for until it is too late.
 

End-of-Life Education Matters

A guest blog post from Kim Devery, Head of Discipline, Senior Lecturer and End-of-Life Essentials Lead, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 7 June 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4032
  • 0 Comments
End-of-Life Education Matters

As a course coordinator of the palliative care courses at Flinders University I have seen our post graduate student population change over time. Ten years ago, students were primarily health professionals who worked in specialist palliative care services. These students worked to expand and update their knowledge, sharpen their skills and improve their own professional capacity to deliver palliative care. 

Today Flinders’ students still work to grow, change and develop, but the student profile is changing. We work with students who are employed across a range of health services including, aged care, emergency departments, pain clinics, medical wards, adult and neonatal intensive care units, and respiratory wards. These professionals are proactively seeking to expand their skills to meet the needs of the growing number of Australians (up to 52%) with a life-limiting illness and who die in acute hospitals. 
 

About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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