CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Dealing with Dying – Some Comments for Carers

A guest blog post by Meg Brassil, Consumer Representative

  • 31 January 2019
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 2360
  • 1 Comments
Dealing with Dying – Some Comments for Carers
Palliative care helps people live their life as fully and as comfortably as possible when living with a life-limiting or terminal illness. Carers play a large role in providing palliative care. Meg Brassil reflects on her role and experience as a carer and provides practical pointers that can help.

Learn more on end-of-life care – free and peer reviewed

A guest blog post by Kim Devery, Senior Lecturer and Head of Discipline, Palliative Care, Flinders University

  • 25 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3435
  • 0 Comments
Learn more on end-of-life care – free and peer reviewed
Let’s be frank, end-of-life care can be tricky. Yes, dying is normal, but it hasn’t been a major focus in the acute hospital systems.  Health care professionals working in acute hospitals can find themselves challenged by patients with end-of-life care needs. Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can be in a situation where they do not know how to best respond to a patient with end-of-life needs. Appropriate end-of-life interventions can be missed.

With 52% of Australians dying in acute hospitals, end-of-life care is essential knowledge for all health care professionals. 

 

Insight into being a carer

A guest blog post by Raechel Damarell, Research Librarian, School of Health Sciences, Flinders University

  • 17 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3689
  • 1 Comments
Insight into being a carer
In May 2011, my widowed mother, Donne, was unexpectedly diagnosed with late stage oesophageal cancer. Mum was the epicentre of my family’s world and my best friend. She had selflessly cared for my two small children from infancy when I returned to work and rarely a day went by when we did not see or speak with her. When palliative chemoradiation proved brutal and her strength failed, it was without hesitation that my family invited her to move in with us so that we might care for her. We had no inkling of how the future would unfold, or what it might be like to watch a loved one gradually die, perhaps in great pain.  We simply felt it right and natural that family surround Mum right until the end. This end came 6 months later.
 

Telehealth: Reducing a Tyranny of Distance and Improving Patient Outcomes

A Guest Blog Post from Patrick Cox, Clinical Practice Consultant, Southern Adelaide Palliative Services

  • 26 April 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3862
  • 0 Comments
Telehealth: Reducing a Tyranny of Distance and Improving Patient Outcomes

The reality for some time in respect to continuing to provide quality health care is “Work smarter not harder”.  The health dollar is becoming like a Northern White Rhinoceros , still in existence but rare. There is ever increasing scrutiny about how both of these prized possessions are used and treated. Continued investment is regularly linked to reportable outcomes, whether it be in the case of the Rhinoceros an increase in their numbers or for the health dollar reduced overall cost.  You are more likely these days to find the CEO of a hospital having an MBA in hospital administration than being a senior clinician. As this is a reality we need to develop strategies / programmes that do have clinically reportable outcomes that they will comprehend.

About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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