CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Carers and caring at the end of life

A guest blog post from Dr Jennifer Tieman, CareSearch Director, Discipline Palliative and Supportive Services, Flinders University

  • 16 October 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3059
  • 5 Comments
Carers and caring at the end of life

In May 2014, Carers Australia published a discussion paper, Dying at home: Preferences and roles for unpaid carers. It seems fitting that during National Carers Week we recognise the contribution that carers make to people who are dying. Most people wish to be cared for and die at home with the people they love and in familiar surroundings. Remaining at home is made much more likely where there is someone, or a group of people, who is willing to provide care and support for the dying person. Family, friends, work colleagues and neighbours all have taken on a caring role.

Carers and Online Health Information

A guest blog post from Dr Jennifer Tieman, CareSearch Director, Associate Professor, Discipline Palliative and Supportive Services

  • 21 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 2619
  • 0 Comments
Carers and Online Health Information
National Carers Week provides us all with an opportunity to stop and think about the care that is needed by palliative care patients and that is given by carers to someone with a life limiting illness. Anyone, at any time, can find themselves responsible for the wellbeing of a partner, family member or friend at the end of their life. Most Australians who know they are going to die spend most of the last year of their life in the community – in their own home, in residential aged care or living with family or friends. This would not be possible without the willingness of people to take on a caring role.
 

Caring doesn’t stop just because a person enters residential aged care

A guest blog post by Kay Richards, National Policy Manager and Rebecca Storen, Policy Officer, Leading Age Services Australia

  • 20 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4741
  • 1 Comments
Caring doesn’t stop just because a person enters residential aged care
I often hear people say that once a person enters a residential aged care facility that the caring role provided by the person’s family and friends is no longer required, and yet this couldn’t be further from the truth. Aged care staff encourage family and friends to stay actively involved in a person’s life. There are many obvious reasons why this is so necessary.

Moving homes is generally a stressful and emotional time and, for residential aged care, this can be further exacerbated by the fact that it is often in response to a crisis. Someone’s mother has been admitted to hospital after a nasty fall or the care requirements of someone’s husband has increased because their diabetes isn’t being well managed. Therefore, not only are people having to make important decisions about where they, or their loved one, is going to live, but this is generally during a time when emotions are high and various members of the family may have different opinions.

 

National Carers Week 2016 – Carers Count!

A guest blog post by Ara Cresswell, Chief Executive Officer, Carers Australia

  • 16 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3958
  • 0 Comments
National Carers Week 2016 – Carers Count!
National Carers Week gives all Australians the opportunity to show their support for Australia’s 2.8 million unpaid carers! This important awareness-raising week runs from 16 – 22 October, when all Australians can ‘let carers know they count’ and help build a carer-friendly Australia.

Australia’s unpaid carers make a tremendous contribution to the nation, undertaking challenging caring roles for family and friends that saves our country billions of dollars annually. This important role can limit carers’ own education and employment opportunities, which in turn can result in social isolation and financial stress, so it is important we acknowledge and recognise the vital work they do.

 

The Needs Assessment Tool for Carers: how GPs can help care for carers

A guest blog post from Prof Geoff Mitchell, Professor of General Practice and Palliative Care at the University of Queensland

  • 2 February 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4907
  • 0 Comments
The Needs Assessment Tool for Carers: how GPs can help care for carers

One of the most troubling aspects of caring for people at the end of life is caring for those left behind.  The problem is simple – everyone focusses on the ill person while curative treatment is attempted. Everyone knows the supporting spouse, child, or friend is there, but the person with the illness is the patient, not the carer. However, being a carer is a risky business. Most carers have little health knowledge or background. The fear of doing the wrong thing and making the ill person worse is ever present. They do not know what is going to happen, and if things go wrong, whom to call and what to do. Studies of carers and patients at the end of life repeatedly show that the carers are more anxious and depressed than the patients themselves.

About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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