CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

The Role of the Occupational Therapist in Palliative Care

A guest blog post by Dr Kathrine Hammill, Lecturer in Occupational Therapy, School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University

  • 29 August 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 11507
  • 0 Comments
The Role of the Occupational Therapist in Palliative Care

Occupational therapy is a health profession which enables people to participate in everyday life activities to the best of their ability despite their condition, illness progression, activity limitations or participation restrictions. In palliative care this premise does not change, as occupational therapists are skilled in enabling people to adapt to their changing ability levels, and helping people to continue living until they die, just as Dame Cicely Sanders famously quoted. However, the role that occupational therapists play is often misunderstood and under-utilised, resulting in the role being limited to discharge planning, home assessments, and equipment prescription. While these are important parts of the occupational therapy role, palliative care occupational therapists can offer so much more to their clients to enable them to keep living and remained engaged in everyday activities for as long as possible. To do this, occupational therapists follow a process which helps them to assess, intervene and evaluate their treatment plans.

Aged care and palliative care: what’s the difference?

A guest blog post by Associate Professor Rosalie Hudson, Consultant educator palliative aged care, dementia care

  • 17 May 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 7577
  • 0 Comments
Aged care and palliative care: what’s the difference?
For this discussion, aged care refers to the additional care required for an older person needing regular health professional input either in the community or in an aged care home.

Palliative care is, according to the WHO (World Health Organisation), ‘an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual’.

Highlighting Pain: World Hospice Day 2016

A guest blog post from Dr Jennifer Tieman, CareSearch Director, Associate Professor, Discipline Palliative and Supportive Services

  • 8 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 2360
  • 0 Comments
Highlighting Pain: World Hospice Day 2016
World Hospice and Palliative Care Day is a unified day of action to celebrate and support hospice and palliative care around the world. It is organised by a committee of the Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance. The purpose of this day is:
  • To share WHPCA's vision of increasing the availability of hospice and palliative care throughout the world by creating opportunities to speak out about the issues
  • To raise awareness and understanding of the needs – medical, social, practical, spiritual – of people living with a life limiting illness and their families
  • To raise funds to support and develop hospice and palliative care services around the world.

“Something vital was missing throughout that process for Maria and her family.”

A guest blog post by Dr Joel Rhee BSc(Med) MBBS(Hons) GradCert(ULT) PhD, FRACGP

  • 27 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3841
  • 1 Comments
“Something vital was missing throughout that process for Maria and her family.”
I remember a patient some years ago. I’ll call her Maria. She was a lovely Italian woman, in her late 80’s, with a very supportive family.
 
Maria had developed very complex medical problems. She had heart issues, kidney problems and quite severe diabetes. In the last year of her life she had recurring kidney failure and breathing difficulties. She was going in and out of hospital every three or four weeks.
 
The medical team did their very best for her – they were very focused on her medical issues and her symptoms, and she received excellent medical care. A lot of focus was given to how best to look after her kidneys, her heart, her pain and her difficulty with breathing. As her problems multiplied and her needs became increasingly complex, the care she received continued to be excellent.

 

About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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