CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Family member experiences of the sudden, unexpected death of a loved one in an emergency department setting

A guest blog post by Dr Tracey Giles, Head of Teaching Section (Nursing), Flinders University

  • 4 May 2018
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3594
  • 0 Comments
Family member experiences of the sudden, unexpected death of a loved one in an emergency department setting
Health care professionals agree that the quality of care provided in the emergency department for dying patients and their families is often not as good as it needs to be. Dr Tracy Giles of Flinders University explains how her research into the experiences of family members will help to identify what is working well already and areas of care that need improvement, and how you can become involved.
 

Lifting weights and spirits!

A guest blog post by Roslyn Savage, Senior Palliative Care Physiotherapist, Sacred Heart Supportive and Palliative Care Service, St Vincent’s Health Network Sydney

  • 11 November 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3680
  • 3 Comments
Lifting weights and spirits!
Move it or lose it, as the saying goes, is relevant to the field of palliative care. In fact, evidence suggests that up to 30% of muscle weakness in advanced illness can be due to inactivity itself.

Physiotherapists are in a prime position to make a difference to how patients experience end of life by helping them maximise their independence at each stage.  Expertise in functional assessment combined with an understanding of the impact of symptoms on the lived experience enables therapists to work closely with patients to improve their quality of life (QOL). 

 

Learn more on end-of-life care – free and peer reviewed

A guest blog post by Kim Devery, Senior Lecturer and Head of Discipline, Palliative Care, Flinders University

  • 25 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 3387
  • 0 Comments
Learn more on end-of-life care – free and peer reviewed
Let’s be frank, end-of-life care can be tricky. Yes, dying is normal, but it hasn’t been a major focus in the acute hospital systems.  Health care professionals working in acute hospitals can find themselves challenged by patients with end-of-life care needs. Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals can be in a situation where they do not know how to best respond to a patient with end-of-life needs. Appropriate end-of-life interventions can be missed.

With 52% of Australians dying in acute hospitals, end-of-life care is essential knowledge for all health care professionals. 

 

Highlighting Pain: World Hospice Day 2016

A guest blog post from Dr Jennifer Tieman, CareSearch Director, Associate Professor, Discipline Palliative and Supportive Services

  • 8 October 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 2567
  • 0 Comments
Highlighting Pain: World Hospice Day 2016
World Hospice and Palliative Care Day is a unified day of action to celebrate and support hospice and palliative care around the world. It is organised by a committee of the Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance. The purpose of this day is:
  • To share WHPCA's vision of increasing the availability of hospice and palliative care throughout the world by creating opportunities to speak out about the issues
  • To raise awareness and understanding of the needs – medical, social, practical, spiritual – of people living with a life limiting illness and their families
  • To raise funds to support and develop hospice and palliative care services around the world.

“Something vital was missing throughout that process for Maria and her family.”

A guest blog post by Dr Joel Rhee BSc(Med) MBBS(Hons) GradCert(ULT) PhD, FRACGP

  • 27 September 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4155
  • 1 Comments
“Something vital was missing throughout that process for Maria and her family.”
I remember a patient some years ago. I’ll call her Maria. She was a lovely Italian woman, in her late 80’s, with a very supportive family.
 
Maria had developed very complex medical problems. She had heart issues, kidney problems and quite severe diabetes. In the last year of her life she had recurring kidney failure and breathing difficulties. She was going in and out of hospital every three or four weeks.
 
The medical team did their very best for her – they were very focused on her medical issues and her symptoms, and she received excellent medical care. A lot of focus was given to how best to look after her kidneys, her heart, her pain and her difficulty with breathing. As her problems multiplied and her needs became increasingly complex, the care she received continued to be excellent.

 
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About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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