CareSearch Blog: Palliative Perspectives

The views and opinions expressed in our blog series are those of the authors and are not necessarily supported by CareSearch, Flinders University and/or the Australian Government Department of Health.
 

Three things you need to know about dementia and dying

A guest blog post by Kirsty Carr, National Policy and Strategy Advisor, Dementia Australia

  • 1 November 2018
  • Author: Guest
  • Number of views: 3038
  • 0 Comments
Three things you need to know about dementia and dying
Many of us are unaware that Dementia is a terminal illness. It is currently the second leading cause of death overall in Australia. Kirsty Carr from Dementia Australia discusses three things you need to know about dementia and dying. 

Aged care and palliative care: what’s the difference?

A guest blog post by Associate Professor Rosalie Hudson, Consultant educator palliative aged care, dementia care

  • 17 May 2017
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 8851
  • 0 Comments
Aged care and palliative care: what’s the difference?
For this discussion, aged care refers to the additional care required for an older person needing regular health professional input either in the community or in an aged care home.

Palliative care is, according to the WHO (World Health Organisation), ‘an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual’.

‘What is needed to improve care planning for people living with dementia?’

A guest blog post from Tim Luckett PhD, Senior Research Fellow, University of Technology Sydney and Ingrid Duff, Research Assistant, Centre for Cardiovascular and Chronic Care

  • 19 July 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 7382
  • 2 Comments
‘What is needed to improve care planning for people living with dementia?’
During National Palliative Care Week, the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) hosted a forum on dementia care planning facilitated by the Director of The Centre for Cardiovascular and Chronic Care, Faculty of Health, Professor Jane Phillips. Imelda Gilmore, an Alzheimer’s Australia NSW Dementia Advocate and wife of a person with dementia, opened the forum by highlighting the importance of “getting the word out to have conversations about end of life early on”. A recurring theme at the forum was the need for care decisions to be person-centred and focused on what the person with dementia would have wanted were they able to speak for themselves, rather than the wishes of surrogate decision-makers. Lynn Chenoweth (Professor of Nursing at the Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, The University of New South Wales) defined person-centredness as respecting the person with dementia’s “values, beliefs, history, likes and dislikes … all of the things that make them unique”.

My Learning: Modules on how evidence can help in practice

A guest blog post from Erin McAllister, Marketing and Communications Manager, Flinders University, South Australia

  • 29 March 2016
  • Author: CareSearch
  • Number of views: 4019
  • 0 Comments
My Learning: Modules on how evidence can help in practice

Health professionals can find it difficult to manage the growing evidence relevant to the care of patients with palliative care needs. While CareSearch provides access to a wide variety of palliative care evidence and resources, knowing which one to use can be tricky. Recognising when it might be worthwhile looking for additional evidence is also important. These were the original reasons why we introduced My Learning, a web-based learning initiative, in 2012.  Educational modules in My Learning introduced health professionals to resources in CareSearch and showed how they could help in clinical care and decision making. Since then, each month, around 100 people complete the learning modules.
 

About our Blog

The CareSearch blog Palliative Perspectives informs and provides a platform for sharing views, tips and ideas related to palliative care from community members and health professionals. 
 

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