Enter your email to be notified when new posts are published

Search this blog

Explore older posts

Newest posts

Improving Patient Outcomes in Palliative Care through Point-of-Care Assessment and Benchmarking

A guest blog post from Karen Quinsey, PCOC National Director

  • 23 August 2016
  • Author: Sam Parker
  • Number of views: 66
  • 0 Comments
Improving Patient Outcomes in Palliative Care through Point-of-Care Assessment and Benchmarking
Who are we?
The Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration (PCOC) is a nationally funded program that uses standardised clinical assessment tools to benchmark and measure patient outcomes in palliative care.
  • PCOC is a collaboration between four universities, each represented by a chief investigator:
  • Professor Kathy Eagar, University of Wollongong, New South Wales
  • Professor David Currow, Flinders University, South Australia
  • Professor Patsy Yates, Queensland University of Technology
  • Dr Claire Johnson, University of Western Australia

Improving Children’s Palliative Care Close to Home in Australia

A guest blog post from Dr Anthony Herbert, Director, Paediatric Palliative Care Service, Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, Brisbane and Project Lead, Quality of Care Collaborative of Australia for Paediatric Palliative Care Education (QuoCCA)

  • 16 August 2016
  • Author: Sam Parker
  • Number of views: 182
  • 1 Comments
Improving Children’s Palliative Care Close to Home in Australia
Children’s palliative care shares many of the principles of palliative care that is provided to adults.  However, there are unique aspects of the care provided in looking after a child with a life limiting illness.  This includes children diagnosed with cancer and non-cancer diagnoses from infancy to young adulthood.  We are also providing this care working with the children’s family (parents, siblings, grandparents) and the broader community (including schools).

The goal of our project is to deliver education in paediatric palliative care in areas outside of the metropolitan centres of Australia, and in all states and territories of Australia.  This reflects the geographic diversity of Australia, with many patients living outside of capital cities, and also large distances between centres.  The anticipated outcome of this education is greater confidence of health professionals to care for dying children, and improved quality of care.

 

PCACE Project: Developing and maintaining guidance for palliative care in aged care

A Guest Blog Post from Dr Jennifer Tieman, CareSearch Director, Associate Professor, Discipline Palliative and Supportive Services

  • 9 August 2016
  • Author: Sam Parker
  • Number of views: 244
  • 2 Comments
PCACE Project: Developing and maintaining guidance for palliative care in aged care
The release of the Guidelines for a Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care (APRAC) and the Guidelines for a Palliative Approach for Aged Care in the Community Setting (COMPAC) were a significant advance in recognising and responding to changing population demography in Australia.  They aimed to support the provision of palliative care for older people living in the community or in residential aged care by identifying and evaluating the evidence for care to promote quality of life for older Australians who have a life-limiting illness or who are becoming progressively frailer during old age. The two sets of guidelines were important landmarks nationally and internationally. 
 

Dying To Know Day: Everyone can make a difference.

A guest blog post from Kerrie Noonan, Cofounder and Director, The GroundSwell Project

  • 2 August 2016
  • Author: Sam Parker
  • Number of views: 441
  • 1 Comments
Dying To Know Day: Everyone can make a difference.
What if we knew how to respond to death and loss when it happens in our family, workplace and community?
What if we knew how to access end of life and palliative care when we needed it?
What would it be like if more of us were willing and able to respond well to death?
What if we planned for death like we plan for other important life events?

 

The Role of Allied Health is Essential for People Living with MND

A guest blog post from Pauline Cerdor, CareSearch Allied Health Advisor

  • 26 July 2016
  • Author: Sam Parker
  • Number of views: 210
  • 0 Comments
The Role of Allied Health is Essential for People Living with MND
I had the pleasure of coordinating the May edition of the CareSearch Allied Health Hub (AHH) newsletter in which we chose to highlight Motor Neurone Disease (MND) for three reasons:

1. Allied health practitioners play a very important role in a multidisciplinary approach which improves quality of life, for both patient and family.
2. Palliative Care week and MND week both occur in May and it was an opportune time to highlight MND.
3. MND is entering the sphere of practice for more allied health practitioners and it has been brought to the public’s attention recently with fundraisers like “Freeze MND”.
RSS
123456789

  • CareSearch is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.

 
Twitter You Tube Linkedin